Alesis Vortex Keytar

The Alesis Vortex is a classy key tar with unprecedented features. It has an extensive layout of touch sensitive keys and velocity sensitive pads on it’s shiny white design, along with pitch and modulation controls on the neck, giving you a near infinite amount of control over your performance. Alesis Vortex Manual | Alesis Vortex Specifications | Alesis Vortex Review | Check Price on eBay One of the more appearing features is that…

Roland Lucina AX-09

Rolands Lucina AX-09 Keytar could be considered a ‘luxury keytar’, purely for it’s beautiful design, and comprehensive feature set. It’s ultra light, and easy on your shoulder, and it’s slimline design and user interface is a since to use. Featuring 150 high quality sounds that cover a wide range of sonic landscapes, this keytar has a 37 note, velocity sensitive keyboard which drives the 128 polyphonic sound engine built in….

Roland AX-1

Rolands AX-1 Keytar is a pure MIDI controller keyboard, designed to be worn like a guitar with a shoulder strap. Conceptually designed by David Sherriff and Andrew Leggo in the U.K., before Roland Europe in Italy took on the electronic engineering, the AX-1 was released to the public around 1986 to much fanfare. Many famous artists have been seen using the AX-1, including Jean-Michel Jarre, Imogen Heap & Peter Gabriel. Roland…

Roland AX-7

Rolands AX-7 keytar builds on the legendary design of the original Roland AX-1 Keytar, released in the 80’s, with an attractive pearl white body, and improved design & feature set. Offering stage performers more freedom and expression, the AX-7 extends the AX-1’s abilities with it’s 5 real time controllers – A touch controller, an expression bar, a hold button and Roland’s famous Invisible D-Beam, where you can use your hands to control…

Roland AX-Synth

Roland’s AX-Synth is a popular, medium to high end Keytar that’s used by many on stage, due to it’s look, feel, and feature set. Featuring a very cool sounding, on-board sound generator, it has a wide variety of presets that would suit all kinds of musical genre’s. Roland AX Synth Manual | Roland AX Synth Specs | Roland AX Synth Review | Check Price On eBay | Check Price On Amazon With voices taken…

Junost 21

The Junost 21 portable keyboard can be considered a “Keytar”, but only because a player can throw it over their shoulder and play it. Really, it’s a portable Synth that has a handle on it that looks like a Keytar. Requiring a battery pack to actually power the device when you’re carting it around, it’s role as a keytar is questionable. Still, we’ve decided to review it here so you…

Yamaha SHS-10

The Yamaha SHS-10 is Keytar released in the 80’s. It features a mini Keyboard, with 32 keys (3 octaves), a pitch bend wheel, a FM Synth offering 25 different voices outputting 6 note polyphony. It also features a chord sequencer to make your performance a little bit easier. It has a older, 5 pin din connector which transmits MIDI out, so you can connect it to a sound module or…

Yamaha SHS-200 Keytar

Yamaha SHS-200 Keytar

The Yamaha SHS-200 Keytar is a MIDI shoulder keyboard with internal sound capabilities.  It features onboard Rhythms and voices, pitch bend wheel and a MIDI connection. This keytar can also be played with pedals using an effects unit or sound module. Yamaha SHS-200 Manual | Yamaha SHS-200 User Reviews | Check Price On eBay This Yamaha keytar model is equipped with 49 mini keys, 56 instrumental voices including Synth, Bass, Jazz Organ, Pipe Organ,…

Yamaha KX5 Keytar

Yamaha KX-5 Keytar

The Yamaha KX5 Keytar comes with initial and aftertouch sensitivity for sharp control of dynamics and timbre through key touch. Yamaha KX5 Manual | Yamaha KX5 Specs | Yamaha KX5 Review | Check Price On eBay The KX5 also features 2-octave transpose control up to 64 voices in the keyboard’s memory and easy to handle volume thumbwheels and modulation. Working with a receiving keyboard, the KX-5 boosts the live performance efficiency…

Korg RK-100s Keytar

Back in 1984, Korg released a Keytar, the RK-100, which gave keyboardists the freedom to move around as they played. This allowed the player to perform in their own right, not being confined to behind a keyboard in a fixed place on stage. Not only that, but it was available in four colours and came in a very stylish body. Today, Korg has resurrected that model, and added some fresh…